Day 21: Rita Williams-Garcia

I love Williams-Garcia! She is a great writer and a cool person to talk with.

rita-hcFor my 28 Days Later post this year, I decided to change things up a bit and make this a little more personal. Our first inspiration post is focused on Rita Williams-Garcia. I’ve known Rita for ten years–she is an author, a teacher, a mentor, a big sister, and a wise and valued friend. She has been an inspiration to many writers, including myself. She is the reason that so many of us are authors today.

Rita Williams-Garcia had been writing for over 30 years, with titles that range from picture books to young adult novels. Personal favorites include Every Time a Rainbow Dies (HarperCollins, 2001), a lyrical love story about a boy named one-crazy-summerThulani and a girl named Ysa–both of whom have seen their fair share of challenges yet still rise to overcome them. And, of course, there is Rita’s more recent Gaither Sisters Book Series, beginning with One Crazy Summer (HarperCollins, 2010). The three…

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Day 20: Michael S. Bandy

A screenwriter and actor, Michael S. Bandy’s first children’s book began as an idea for a movie short. Inspired by his agent, he and co-author Eric Stein began the hard work of creating a picture book instead. That decision would launch a new career. White Water (illustrated by Shadra Strickland, published by Candlewick), their children’s book debut, became an award-winning title that was turned into a TV movie.

Since then, Michael and his writing partner have written two more books for kids – the acclaimed Granddaddy’s Turnand the forthcoming Northbound, both published by Candlewick and inspired by Michael’s life. We are proud to feature Michael on Day 20.

The Journey

My foray in publishing has been one of exhilaration and wonderment. It began over 30 years ago when I was an NBC Page. There with my future writing partner, Eric Stein (who was a Page as well), we attempted to come up with writing…

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DAY 19: Anaya Lee Willabus

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As an author / illustrator, there’s nothing like looking back at the books I’ve done to make me feel proud. And when I think that I published my first book way back in 1997, there’s nothing quite like that to make me feel old. With the possible exception of interviewing Anaya Lee Willabus, who is all of 9 years old! Once I got over that, it was indeed a pleasure to share the spotlight on this up-and-coming author.

So without further delay, The Brown Bookshelf would like to introduce you to today’s star of 28 Days Later: Miss Anaya Lee Willabus.

Enjoy!

The Process: How do you work? Do you start with a character, a concept, an idea? Do you outline first or just go? Is there a technique or routine for drafting or revising that you find particularly helpful? Do you have an office or other location that works…

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Day 18: Benjamin Zephaniah

Interesting author! I will check out his books! Thanks for writing about him!

photo-estonia

I read in an interview with Lynn Baber in 2009 that Benjamin Zephaniah lives in England for seven months out of the year, the rest of the time he lives in China. Wow, that sounds like an interesting guy. Reading more about him, proved that thought to be true. He is a poet, novelist, lyricist, musician and a Tai Chi follower.

Zephaniah is the author of several young adult novels. Terror Kid (Hot Key Books, 2014) tells the story of Rico, a computer whizz kid. He wants to help during the English riots, but he also doesn’t want to attract trouble. Can he use his computer skills to help? Is the new guy, Speech, the answer? Read more about Zephaniah here The Guardian . terror-kid-final-cover-180x276-1

faceZephaniah is also the author of Face (Bloomsbury Children and Teen; Reprint edition 2004). Marin Turner’s face is badly disfigured in a horrific car accident. Taunted…

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[Review] Not A Self-Help Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu – by Yi Shun Lai — Read Diverse Books

I have never read a self-help book myself, at least not all the way through, but I’ve heard that they’re a multi-billion dollar industry just in the U.S. alone. It seems Americans are willing to spend big money on self-improvement or ways to “fix” themselves. I can certainly see the appeal. Who doesn’t want to…

via [Review] Not A Self-Help Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu – by Yi Shun Lai — Read Diverse Books