The Brown Bookshelf 28 Days Later Campaign Day 23

Deloris Jordan, the mother of basketball star Michael Jordan and four other children, once worked as a bank teller, but is now known as an inspirational author and speaker. Jordan is regarded as an advocate for children and families with her work through the James Jordan Foundation in Chicago, Illinois, as well as the Jordan […]

via Day 23: Deloris Jordan —

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The Brown Bookshelf 28 Days Later Campaign Day 17

Well. A lot has happened since the BBS team elected to honor fine artist and breakout children’s book illustrator Gordon C. James in this year’s 28 Days Later campaign. By a lot I mean the blowing up of his beautiful new book, CROWN: An Ode to the Fresh Cut (written by Derrick Barnes, published by […]

via Day 17: Gordon C. James —

Congrats to the 2018 Pura Belpré Awards winners!

Congratulations to the authors and illustrators who were honored at the American Library Association’s Midwinter conference! The newest Pura Belpré Awards went to Ruth Behar for Lucky Broken Girl and Juana Martinez-Neal for her illustrations in La Princesa and the Pea. Click on the links below to get more information on the creators and their work! […]

via ¡Felicidades! to the 2018 Pura Belpré Award Winners and Honor Books — Latinxs in Kid Lit

The Brown Bookshelf 28 Days Later Campaign Day 9: Vashti Harrison

Chances are you’re already familiar with Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, given it had already earned best-seller status before its official release date. But how familiar are you with its creator, Vashti Harrison? In today’s 28 Days Later spotlight, Harrison shares her path from art student to New York Times instant bestselling author-illustrator—a path paved […]

via Day 9: Vashti Harrison —

The Black Experience in Children’s Books

From blackpast.org: Librarian, author, and storyteller Augusta Braxston Baker was the first African American woman to hold an administrative position with the New York Public Library (NYPL). She was a pioneering advocate of the positive portrayal of blacks in children’s literature, and beginning in the 1930s removed books with negative stereotypes from the NYPL shelves. Baker was born in […]

via THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IN CHILDREN’S BOOKS: SELECTIONS FROM AUGUSTA BAKER’S BIBLIOGRAPHIES — Blackness Personified